Title IX

What Is Title IX?

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal civil rights law that prohibits discrimination in federally funded educational programs and activities, regardless of gender or gender identity. All public and private colleges and universities receiving any federal financial assistance must comply with Title IX. Title IX protects students, faculty, and staff of all genders and gender identities from sexual harassment, regardless of who is the harasser.

It is the policy of GTCC that all students and employees shall have the right to work and/or learn in an environment free from sexual harassment. No employee, student, or visitor to the campus may engage in conduct that falls under the definition of sexual harassment. Students engaging in violence or harassment are in violation of the college’s Student Code of Conduct Policy, and such behavior will result in sanctions against the student ranging from interim suspension to expulsion. Disciplinary action by the college does not preclude the possibility of criminal charges.

For additional information, please see GTCC’s Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, and Anti-Harassment Policy.

For a quick overview of our policy and available resources, download our Title IX Brochure.

For more detailed information on your protections and resources under Title IX, click the links below.

Sexual misconduct takes on many forms, but its basis is unwelcome sexual activity.
The college, in accordance with Title IX, uses the following definitions:

Domestic Violence

Domestic violence (also called intimate partner violence (IPV), domestic abuse or relationship abuse) is a pattern of behaviors used by one partner to maintain power and control over another partner in an intimate relationship.

Anyone of any race, age, sexual orientation, religion, gender, or gender identity can be a victim – or perpetrator – of domestic violence. It can happen to people who are married, living together, or who are dating. It affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels.

Domestic violence includes behaviors that physically harm, arouse fear, prevent a partner from doing what they wish, or force a partner to behave in ways they do not want to behave.

It includes the following:

  • Use of physical and sexual violence
  • Threats and intimidation
  • Emotional abuse
  • Economic deprivation

Many of these different forms of domestic violence and abuse can be occurring at any one time within the same intimate relationship.

For more information, see the National Domestic Violence Hotline’s Power and Control Wheel.

Source: The National Domestic Violence Hotline

Gender Identity Harassment

Gender identity harassment is behavior that targets someone for offensive, hostile, degrading or insulting treatment based on that person’s self-perception as male, female, a blend of both or neither. One’s gender identity can be the same or different from their sex assigned at birth.

Hostile Environment

Conduct creating a hostile environment is offensive, unwelcome behavior that causes a person or people to feel uncomfortable, frightened, or intimidated.

Hostile environment is evaluated from the perspective of a reasonable person in the alleged victim’s position considering all the circumstances. The more severe the conduct, the less need there is to show a repetitive series of incidents (particularly if the conduct is physically violent). A single incident of sexual violence may create a hostile environment.

Factors to consider in determining whether a hostile environment has been created are:

  • Whether the conduct was verbal or physical or both
  • How frequently it was repeated
  • Whether the conduct was hostile or clearly offensive
  • Whether others joined in perpetrating the harassment
  • Whether the harassment was directed at more that one individual

Interpersonal Violence

Interpersonal violence is also referred to as intimate partner violence, dating violence, domestic violence, and relationship violence.

Interpersonal violence can encompass a broad range of abusive behavior committed by a person who is or has been:

  • In a romantic or intimate relationship with the Reporting Party (of the same or different sex);
  • The Reporting Party’s spouse or partner (of the same or different sex);
  • The Reporting Party’s family member; or
  • The Reporting Party’s cohabitant or household member, including a roommate

Whether there was such relationship will be gauged by its length, type, and frequency of interaction.

Interpersonal violence includes actions or threats of actions that are damaging—

  • physically,
  • sexually,
  • emotionally,
  • economically, and/or
  • psychologically

that a reasonable person in similar circumstances, and with similar identities, would find—

  • intimidating,
  • frightening,
  • terrorizing, and/or
  •  threatening.

Such behaviors may include threats of violence to one’s self, one’s family member, or one’s pet.

Common signs of interpersonal violence include the following:

  • Your partner is excessively jealous and possessive;
  • Your partner controls where you go; and/or
  • Your partner isolates you from your friends and family

Sexual Assault

Sexual assault is subjecting any person to contact or behavior of a sexual nature or for the purposes of sexual gratification without the person’s express and explicit consent. For more information on what constitutes consent, see What is Consent? below.

Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is physical contact and/or conduct that creates an unwelcome or hostile environment.

Sexual harassment includes—

  • unwelcome sexual advances,
  • requests for sexual favors, and
    • Your partner is excessively jealous and possessive;
    • Your partner controls where you go; and/or
    • Your partner isolates you from your friends and familyother verbal or physical contact of a sexual nature, violence, domestic violence, and relationship violence.

      Interpersonal violence can encompass a broad range of abusive behavior committed by a person who is or has been:

      • In a romantic or intimate relationship with the Reporting Party (of the same or different sex);
      • The Reporting Party’s spouse or partner (of the same or different sex);
      • The Reporting Party’s family member; or
      • The Reporting Party’s cohabitant or household member, including a roommate

      Whether there was such relationship will be gauged by its length, type, and frequency of interaction.

      Interpersonal violence includes actions or threats of actions that are damaging—

      • physically,
      • sexually,
      • emotionally,
      • economically, and/or
      • psychologically

      that a reasonable person in similar circumstances, and with similar identities, would find—

      • intimidating,
      • frightening,
      • terrorizing

      Such behaviors may include threats of violence to one’s self, one’s family member, or one’s pet. Common signs of interpersonal violence include the following:

Inquiries into one’s sexual experiences and/or discussion of one’s sexual activities, interests or intents.

Sexual Assault

Sexual assault is subjecting any person to contact or behavior of a sexual nature or for the purposes of sexual gratification without the person’s express and explicit consent. For more information on what constitutes consent, see What is Consent? below.

Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is physical contact and/or conduct that creates an unwelcome or hostile environment.

Sexual harassment includes—

  • unwelcome sexual advances,
  • requests for sexual favors, and
  • other verbal or physical contact of a sexual nature

when

  • submission to the conduct is made a term or condition of an individual’s employment or academic performance (either stated or implied)
  • submission to or rejection of the conduct is used as the basis for employment or educational decisions affecting the individual, or
  • the conduct is sufficiently severe, persistent, or pervasive to interfere with an individual’s work or academic performance or to create an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or learning environment.

Occasional compliments of a socially acceptable nature do not constitute sexual harassment.

While it is not possible to list all of the circumstances that might constitute sexual harassment, the following are some examples of conduct that, if unwelcome, could constitute sexual harassment depending upon the totality of the circumstances, including the severity of the conduct and its pervasiveness.

This list includes but is not limited to:

  • Jokes, comments, or gestures directed at a person based on their gender or sexual identify;
  • Displaying sexually suggestive objects, pictures, cartoons; use of electronic communications to download or transmit materials with pornographic, profane, or sexually explicit content;
  • Unwelcome leering, whistling, brushing against the body, sexual gestures, suggestive or insulting comments;
  • Inquiries into one’s sexual experiences and/or discussion of one’s sexual activities, interests or intents.
Sexual Violence

Sexual violence is subjecting any person to contact or behavior of a sexual nature or for the purposes of sexual gratification without the person’s express and explicit consent.

Sexual violence is also physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will, such as situations in which a person is incapable of giving consent due to the student’s age, use of drugs or alcohol, or due to intellectual or other disability that prevents the student from having the capacity to give consent.

For more information on what constitutes consent, see What is Consent? below.

Stalking

Stalking is engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress.

Stalking behaviors may include:

  • Persistent patterns of leaving or sending the victim unwanted items or presents;
  • Following or lying in wait for the victim;
  • Damaging or threatening to damage the victim’s property;
  • Defaming the victim’s character, or harassing the victim via the Internet through social media, email, or unwelcome contacts via telephone or text message, or by other electronic means such as posting personal information or spreading rumors.

Consent is the explicit approval to engage in sexual activity demonstrated by clear actions or words. Anyone engaging in sexual activity without clear consent is in violation of college policies regarding sexual harassment and in violation of Title IX.

This decision must be made freely and actively by all participants. Non-verbal communication, silence, passivity or lack of active resistance does not imply consent. Consent cannot be inferred from the absence of a “no”; a clear “yes,” verbal or otherwise, is necessary.

In addition, previous participation in sexual activity does not indicate current consent to participate and consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other forms of sexual activity.

Consent must be ongoing throughout a sexual encounter and can be revoked at any time.

Consent has not been obtained in situations where the individual:

  • is forced, pressured, manipulated or has reasonable fear that they will be injured if they do not submit to the act;
  • is incapable of giving consent or is prevented from resisting due to physical or mental incapacity (including being under the influence of drugs or alcohol); or
  • has a mental or physical disability which inhibits his/her ability to give consent to sexual activity.

For more information see What Is Sexual Misconduct? above.

IMPORTANT: If you are in an emergency situation, call 911 and get to a safe place as quickly as possible.

The GTCC Quick Reference Guide

The GTCC Quick Reference Guide provides you with the steps you can follow if you or someone you know has experienced sexual violence, interpersonal violence, or stalking.

Resources a person may need immediately after an incident may be different from those needed by a person who has experienced an incident a week, a month, or even a year ago.

Please use these resources as needed.

Download the guide

What To Do If You Have Been A Victim Of Sexual Assault

Contact Law Enforcement

If you have been a victim of sexual assault, you should take the following steps:

  1. Go to a safe place as soon as possible.
  2. Call the police:
    • On Campus – Call Ext. 50911 or 336-819-2046.
    • Off Campus – Call 911.
    • Either campus police or a local police agency will respond to an alleged assault call.
  3. Stay on the phone with the dispatcher as long as you are needed.
  4. Call someone you trust, such as a friend or relative, to help and support you.
  5. The preservation of physical evidence may be critical for successful prosecution of the offender.
    • Do not change your clothes. If you do, put the clothing you were wearing in separate paper bags (not plastic) and take them to the hospital. This clothing may be used as evidence for prosecution. If you wear the clothes to the hospital, bring a change of clothes with you. Most physical evidence cannot be recovered after seventy-two hours.
    • Do not clean your body or your clothes. Preserve all physical evidence. Do not wash, bathe, douche, comb your hair, or use the toilet if you can help it. Washing might be the first thing you want to do, but don’t. You literally might be washing away valuable evidence. Wait until after you have a medical examination.
    • Do not alter or disturb the crime scene. Leave tables, fixtures, grass, etc., as they were after the assault so that investigators may view the area. Ideally, evidence should be collected within twenty-four hours of the assault.
  6. Campus Police will need your assistance to make a crime report. You may ask for a victim advocate to be present when making a report. GTCC has a trained group of staff members who will support and assist you in accessing medical and counseling services and in reporting the incident to the appropriate local law enforcement authorities.

Seek Medical Attention

If you have experienced physical or sexual violence, go to a hospital for evidence collection, treatment of injuries, and medication for sexually transmitted infections and pregnancy prevention. Forensic exams can be obtained for up to five days after an assault.

Local hospitals include the following:

HIGH POINT REGIONAL HOSPITAL — 336-878-6000
601 North Elm Street
High Point, NC 27261
Website

MEDCENTER HIGH POINT — 336-884-3777
2630 Willard Dairy Road
High Point, NC 27265
Website

MOSES H. CONE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL — 336-832-7000
1200 N Elm Street
Greensboro, NC 27401
Website

WESLEY LONG HOSPITAL — 336-832-1000
2400 W Friendly Avenue
Greensboro, NC 27403
Website

Report the Incident to the College

Reporting to the college provides you with the option of addressing the incident under the college’s Sexual Harassment, Sexual Violence, and Anti-Harassment Policy. It also allows the college to provide any available interim protective measures, academic accommodations, or changes to class or work schedules.

Students, faculty, and staff may report incidents to any trusted faculty or staff member. Managers, supervisors, faculty, staff, and other agents of the college are required to respond promptly and appropriately to allegations of sexual harassment and violence that are brought to their attention.

Regardless of when the incident occurred, you are encouraged to report the incident.

For more information, see File A Report below.

For students:
MICHAEL HUGHES, Chief Disciplinary Officer & Title IX Coordinator
Medlin Campus Center, Suite 320 – Jamestown Campus
Phone: 336-334-4822, Ext. 50572
Email

For employees:
Cheryl Bryant-Shanks, Chief Human Resources Officer & Title IX Coordinator
Jamestown Campus - Medlin Campus Center, Suite 307
Phone: 336-334-4822 Ext. 50279
Email

Seek Confidential Support

Confidential emotional and psychological support can be obtained at any time.

The GTCC Counseling Center staff is trained to provide assistance to individuals during times of crisis and also have access to resources outside of the college that they can draw upon to assist you.

DR. CHRIS CHAFIN, Director, Counseling and DisAbility Access Services
Jamestown Campus – Davis Hall, Room 107
336-334-4822, Ext. 50262
Email

FRANKIE LANE, Coordinator, Student Support Services
Greensboro Campus – Continuing Education Center, Room 132
336-334-4822, Ext. 53059
Email

TRACY MACK, Coordinator, Student Support Services
Jamestown Campus – Medlin Campus Center, Room 202-B
336-334-4822, Ext. 50698
Email

JADARIUS JACKSON, Advisor, DisAbility Access Services Counselor
Greensboro Campus – Continuing Education Center, Room 128
336-334-4822, Ext. 53021
Email

All students, employees, and others on campus are strongly encouraged to report incidents, or knowledge of incidents, of sexual violence or harassment to a responsible college official as soon as possible after they occur.

The college will respond to complaints of sexual violence or harassment by taking timely action to eliminate the sexual violence or harassment, prevent its recurrence, and address its effects.

Documentation of Title IX complaints received by the college and the college’s response to these complaints are maintained in the Title IX Coordinator’s Office. Title IX complaints are resolved within 60 days from the time the college is made aware of the complaint.

Students, employees, and others on campus may also choose to report incidents of sexual violence or harassment, including dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking, to law enforcement.

The college investigation and criminal investigation processes can occur simultaneously.

Reporting to the College

The college has a variety of reporting options available to receive Title IX complaints.

Students are encouraged to report incidents of sexual misconduct, inquiries, or concerns related to Title IX or the college’s non-discrimination policy to one of the college’s Title IX Coordinators. Title IX Coordinators are:

  • Knowledgeable and trained in college policies and procedures and relevant state and federal laws;
  • Available to advise any individual, including a Reporting Party (Complainant), a Responding Party (Respondent), or a third party, about college and community resources and reporting options;
  • Available to provide assistance to any college employee regarding how to respond appropriately to a report of Title IX-related incident.
  • Responsible for overseeing training, prevention, and education efforts and annual reviews of climate and culture.
  • Responsible for overseeing the College’s response to Title IX reports and complaints and identifying and addressing any patterns or systemic problems revealed by such reports and complaints.

For Students:

MICHAEL HUGHES, Chief Disciplinary Officer & Title IX Coordinator
Medlin Campus Center, Suite 320 – Jamestown Campus
336-334-4822, Ext. 50572
Email

For Employees:

Cheryl Bryant-Shanks, Chief Human Resources Officer & Title IX Coordinator
Jamestown Campus - Medlin Campus Center, Suite 307
336-334-4822 Ext. 50279
Email

Any individual can make a report to the above individuals or law enforcement agencies. The report may be made in person, by telephone, in writing, by e-mail, electronically, or anonymously. Any report involving a minor will be shared with external child protective service (North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services) and law enforcement.

Upon receiving a complaint, the Title IX Coordinator, or his/her designee, shall fully investigate the facts alleged in the complaint.  Typically the investigative process takes approximately 60 days; in certain circumstances, such as semester breaks, extensions of that time may occur.  If an extension of time is necessary, parties will be notified in writing, and the reason for the delay will be documented.

GTCC’S Lead Title IX Coordinator:

  1. ALISON WIERS, Associate Vice President, Student Support Services
    Medlin Campus Center, Suite 320 – Jamestown Campus
    336-334-4822, Ext. 50565
    Email

Reporting to Law Enforcement

On Campus:

GTCC Campus Police336-819-2046 (24 hour direct-dial)

Jamestown Campus – Medlin Campus Center, Room 101, 336-334-4822, Ext. 52529

High Point Campus – Building H-1, Room 121,336-334-4822, Ext. 55013

Greensboro Campus – Continuing Education Center, Room 148, 336-334-4822, Ext. 53015

Aviation I, II, and III Campuses – Aviation III Building, Room 118, 336-334-4822, Ext. 59007

Local Law Enforcement:

Guilford County Sheriff’s Office
400 West Washington Street
Greensboro, NC 27401
336-641-3694
sheriff@co.guilford.nc.us

Greensboro Police Department
300 West Washington Street
Greensboro, NC 27401
336-373-2287
http://p2c.greensboro-nc.gov/main.aspx

High Point Police Department
1009 Leonard Avenue
High Point, NC 27260
336-883-3224
http://www.highpointnc.gov/police/

Responsible Employees – Private

Please know that the entire college community is here to support you!

However, you need to know the classification of the individual with whom you share information so that they can provide you with the appropriate help.

Privacy and confidentiality have distinct meanings under this policy.

Privacy generally means information will be shared only as needed to provide support for the person or people involved, to ensure the safety of the college community, and to maintain legal compliance.

Confidentiality generally means information will not be shared with others.  However, exceptions apply when there is a present danger to an individual or the college community.

College employees that serve as “Responsible Employees” are responsible for maintaining confidentiality by sharing information with a specific circle of people therefore, limiting knowledge of the situation as much as possible, to preserve privacy and ensure safety.

These “Responsible Employees” include all employees of the college as follows:

  • Full-time, part-time, and adjunct faculty
  • Full-time and part-time staff
  • Contract employees
  • Student employees
  • Volunteers working under the authority of the college

Administrators:

  • Vice Presidents
  • Associate Vice Presidents
  • Campus Deans
  • Faculty Division Chairs
  • Faculty Department Chairs
  • Faculty Program Chairs

Student Affairs:

  • Student Success Center
  • Student Success Specialists
  • Career Services
  • International Student Services
  • Orientation Leaders
  • Chief Disciplinary Officer

Athletic Department:

  • Athletic Director
  • Coaches, Assistant Coaches, and Trainers

These “Responsible Employees” are required to share information with the college’s Title IX Compliance Coordinator. There are many options for resolution of a report. The college encourages the reporting of an incident even if the reporting party is not seeking disciplinary action against the responding party and will make every effort to respect the reporting party’s autonomy in determining how to proceed. Support and resources are always available to a reporting party regardless of the chosen course of action.

Confidential Resources

Confidentiality means information shared by a person with designated campus or community professionals cannot be revealed to any other entity without the express permission of that person, unless required by law.

The law defines counselors, medical providers, and clergy as confidential. The law also allows GTCC to designate additional personnel who may maintain the confidentiality of a victim’s report internally to the college, but those individuals cannot provide the same level of legal privilege externally that may be afforded by the law to information held by counselors, medical providers, and clergy.

These individuals are prohibited from breaking confidentiality unless there is an imminent threat of harm to self or others, or if a report involves suspected abuse of a minor under the age of 18. Confidential entities, like many other professions, including employees in higher education, are required by state law to notify Child Protective Services or local law enforcement in cases of suspected child abuse.

Confidential Resources at GTCC:

DR. CHRIS CHAFIN, Director, Counseling and DisAbility Access Services
Jamestown Campus – Davis Hall, Room 107
336-334-4822, Ext. 50262
Email

FRANKIE LANE, Coordinator, Student Support Services
Greensboro Campus – Continuing Education Center, Room 132
336-334-4822, Ext. 53059
Email

TRACY MACK, Coordinator, Student Support Services
Jamestown Campus – Medlin Campus Center, Room 202-B
336-334-4822, Ext. 50698
Email

JADARIUS JACKSON, Advisor, DisAbility Access Services Counselor
Greensboro Campus – Continuing Education Center, Room 128
336-334-4822, Ext. 53021
Email

GTCC Resources For Students

CHRIS CHAFIN, Director, Counseling and DisAbility Access Services
Jamestown Campus – Davis Hall, Room 107
Phone: 336-334-4822, Ext. 50262
Email

FRANKIE LANE, Coordinator, Student Support Services
Greensboro Campus – Continuing Education Center, Room 132
336-334-4822, Ext. 53059
Email

TRACY MACK, Coordinator, Student Support Services
Jamestown Campus – Medlin Campus Center, Room 202-B
336-334-4822, Ext. 50698
Email

JADARIUS JACKSON, Advisor, DisAbility Access Services Counselor
Greensboro Campus – Continuing Education Center, Room 128
336-334-4822, Ext. 53021
Email

GTCC Resources For Employees

GTCC employees have access to an Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

EAP information can be found at https://my.gtcc.edu/faculty_staffservices/hr/Pages/default.aspx or through the Human Resources Office:

Jamestown Campus
Medlin Campus Center
Room 370
336-334-4822, Ext. 50269

Community Resources

Family Services of the Piedmont
Website

CRISIS HOTLINE: 336-273-7273

Greensboro Office
Washington Street Building
315 East Washington Street
Greensboro, NC 27404
336-387-6161

High Point Office
Slane Center
1401 Long Street
High Point, NC 27262-2541
336-889-6161

Main Office – Jamestown
Jamestown Building (Ragsdale YMCA)
902 Bonner Drive
Jamestown, NC 27282
336-899-6161

Guilford County Family Justice Center
Guilford County Family Justice Center
201 S. Greene Street (2nd Floor)
Greensboro, NC 27410
336-641-SAFE (7233)

Website

City of Greensboro Police Department Sexual Assault Information

Website

Cone Health

Website: Cone Health Services for Victims of Sexual Assault

Additional Resources

Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN)

WebsiteThe National Sexual Assault Hotline (available 24/7):
Phone: 800-656-HOPE (4673)
Online chat: online.rainn.org

North Carolina Council for Women

Sexual Assault Programs Directory (Statewide)

Website

North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Violence 

Website

Survivor Project

Website

Safe Horizon

Website

Title IX is a law that bans sex discrimination in schools that get federal funds. Title IX makes it illegal to exclude students who may be, are, or have been pregnant from an educational program.

This means that colleges must give all students who might be, are, or have been pregnant the same access to classes and programs that other students have.

Your instructors or school officials should not tell you to drop out or change your educational plans because you are pregnant or gave birth.

Please review the resources below, both from the National Women’s Law Center, for additional information.

NWLC Fact Sheet: Pregnant and Parenting Students’ Rights

NWLC Pregnant and Parenting Students’ Rights Toolkit

If you have additional questions, please contact:

MICHAEL HUGHES, Chief Disciplinary Officer & Title IX Coordinator
Medlin Campus Center, Suite 320 – Jamestown Campus
336-334-4822, Ext. 50572
Email

Athletic programs are considered educational programs and activities. There are three basic parts of Title IX as it applies to athletics.

Participation

Title IX requires that women and men be provided equitable opportunities to participate in sports. Title IX does not require institutions to offer identical sports but an equal opportunity to play.

Scholarships

Title IX requires that female and male student-athletes receive athletic scholarship dollars proportional to their participation.

Other Benefits

Title IX requires the equal treatment of female and male student-athletes in the provisions of the following:

  • Equipment and supplies
  • Scheduling of games and practice times
  • Travel and daily allowance
  • Access to tutoring
  • Coaching
  • Locker rooms, practice and competitive facilities
  • Medical and training facilities and services
  • Publicity and promotions
  • Support services
  • Recruitment of student-athletes

For information about pregnant and parenting student-athletes’ rights, see Title IX and Pregnancy above.

Guilford Technical Community College is committed to providing an educational and working environment that is free from discrimination and harassment for faculty, staff, and students.

This commitment extends to prospective employees (applicants) as well.

In accordance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C.1681 etseq.GTCC prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs and activities operated by recipients of Federal financial assistance. The College does not unlawfully discriminate and offers equal access to its educational programs and activities regardless of an individual’s sex or gender (including gender expression, gender identity and sexual orientation). Under Title IX, discrimination on the basis of gender or sex can include sexual harassment, sexual violence, sexual assault, sexual battery, sexual coercion, interpersonal violence, and stalking.

Retaliation against anyone who in good faith brings forward a complaint pursuant to this policy is strictly prohibited. Anyone responsible for retaliation, or threats of retaliation will be subject to disciplinary action by GTCC up to and including suspension, expulsion or other termination from the College. Retaliation should be reported promptly to one of the College’s Title IX Coordinators. Retaliation by a person not affiliated with the College may be addressed by Campus Police.

The United States Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (OCR) is the entity responsible for monitoring compliance with Title IX.

Office for Civil Rights
District of Columbia Office
U.S. Department of Education

400 Maryland Avenue, S.W.
Washington, DC 20202-1475
Telephone: (202) 453-6020
Facsimile: (202) 453-6021
Email

It takes all of us to ensure a safe campus environment for students, faculty, and staff. This means that if you see something or know something – SAY SOMETHING! Do not assume someone else is going to report the incident.

GTCC is dedicated to monitoring reports of sexual violence in an effort to determine if patterns exist and will work to address any identified patterns. Additionally, GTCC provides pertinent information and on-going training on various related topics to raise awareness and provide resources for both employees and students with regard to Title IX and discrimination.

For additional information, please access the Campus Police page

It’s On Us

GTCC is a community of students, faculty, administrators, and staff working together to maintain a safe and secure learning and working environment.